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From government advisor to naturopath

Swissinfo EN - Mon, 08/27/2018 - 17:00
Many people change their professions when they move to Switzerland from another country. It can be because their qualifications are not recognised, or because it’s a good moment to try something new. Lisa Allansson was once an economic advisor to the Australian government. Now she's a naturopath, working in canton Fribourg. This is how she changed her career.  After graduating with a degree in economics, Lisa worked in Queensland's Department of Environment and Heritage, and then the cabinet office, where she advised the future Prime Minister, Kevin Rudd. During her time as a government policy advisor, she also studied natural medicine at night school, never intending to practice it.  Lisa was frustrated by her failure to make a significant impact on environmental policies. She told swissinfo.ch, "I really felt I was selling my soul". She left her job to take up a voluntary post in a Greek bird sanctuary. When her money ran out, she went to London with the idea of working as ...
Categories: News EN

Politicians react to shocking attacks on women

Swissinfo EN - Mon, 08/27/2018 - 17:00
Six women were the victims of violent crimes committed by men in Geneva and Zurich in August. The crimes have sent shock waves shuddering through social media channels, newspapers and the world of politics – starting in a Geneva nightclub and reaching the seat of government in Bern. The viral #metoo campaign brought the issue of violence against women to the Swiss public at the end of 2017. Social media has made the Swiss people aware of the problem. In the early hours of August 8, a group of men attacked a woman at a night spot. Four other women who tried to help the victim were also brutally attacked. All five were taken to hospital, two with serious injuries.  The Geneva public prosecutor has identified the assailants. They come from France, but they are still at large. Eyewitnesses describe them as being of north African origin.  On August 12, as nearly a million people took part in Zurich’s Street Parade, a woman was brutally attacked. Eventually, two men came to her aid, ...
Categories: News EN

From government advisor to naturopath

Swissinfo EN - Mon, 08/27/2018 - 17:00
Many people change their professions when they move to Switzerland from another country. It can be because their qualifications are not recognised, or because it’s a good moment to try something new. Lisa Allansson was once an economic advisor to the Australian government. Now she's a naturopath, working in canton Fribourg. This is how she changed her career.  After graduating with a degree in economics, Lisa worked in Queensland's Department of Environment and Heritage, and then the cabinet office, where she advised the future Prime Minister, Kevin Rudd. During her time as a government policy advisor, she also studied natural medicine at night school, never intending to practice it.  Lisa was frustrated by her failure to make a significant impact on environmental policies. She told swissinfo.ch, "I really felt I was selling my soul". She left her job to take up a voluntary post in a Greek bird sanctuary. When her money ran out, she went to London with the idea of working as ...
Categories: News EN

Embattled news industry finds allies in ivory tower

Swissinfo EN - Mon, 08/27/2018 - 11:00
From “fake news” to the loss of readers and advertisers, the list of challenges facing the media sector is long and daunting. Enter the new Initiative for Media Innovation, which wants to find novel ways to help outlets thrive in the digital age. Mounir Krichane is working his way through the grim list of difficulties currently facing the news industry in Switzerland and other countries. As the director of the Media Centre at the Federal Institute of Technology Lausanne (EPFL), he has no magic solutions under his sleeve but a strong conviction about one approach in particular: partnerships. “It’s become more difficult for media organisations big or small to tackle their challenges alone,” says Krichane. The digital shift in media has come so swiftly, he explains, that everyone is a step behind playing catch-up. The aim of the Initiative for Media Innovation (IMI), which the engineer leads, is to connect researchers in their ivory tower or tech lab with news publishers interested ...
Categories: News EN

Embattled news industry finds allies in ivory tower

Swissinfo EN - Mon, 08/27/2018 - 11:00
From “fake news” to the loss of readers and advertisers, the list of challenges facing the media sector is long and daunting. Enter the new Initiative for Media Innovation, which wants to find novel ways to help outlets thrive in the digital age. Mounir Krichane is working his way through the grim list of difficulties currently facing the news industry in Switzerland and other countries. As the director of the Media Centre at the Federal Institute of Technology Lausanne (EPFL), he has no magic solutions under his sleeve but a strong conviction about one approach in particular: partnerships. “It’s become more difficult for media organisations big or small to tackle their challenges alone,” says Krichane. The digital shift in media has come so swiftly, he explains, that everyone is a step behind playing catch-up. The aim of the Initiative for Media Innovation (IMI), which the engineer leads, is to connect researchers in their ivory tower or tech lab with news publishers interested ...
Categories: News EN

'Fake news', therapy animals and binational heartbreak

Swissinfo EN - Sun, 08/26/2018 - 12:00
Here are some of the stories we'll be following the week of August 27: Monday  From “fake news” to the loss of readers and advertisers, the list of challenges facing the media sector is long and daunting. Enter the new Initiative for Media Innovation, which wants to find novel ways to help outlets thrive in the digital age. Tuesday Old-age homes have a reputation for being dull, clinical and devoid of charm. We visit one that tries to buck the trend by hosting residents of the furry and feathered kind as a way to help provide therapy to those who need it.  Wednesday Marriage between Swiss nationals and foreigners is on the rise. We look at what happens when the attraction fades. Are binational couples more likely to divorce?   Thursday We continue on the nostalgia trail using tips from our readers to dig up Swiss cultural relics. This time we resurrect Saturday school, a singing bus driver, chimney sweeps and a well-travelled blue-coloured ...
Categories: News EN

World’s steepest funicular puts Stoos back on the tourist map

Swissinfo EN - Sun, 08/26/2018 - 11:00
Straight up to the top of the mountain: the Stoos funicular railway gives you the steepest ascent of its kind in the world. For the little Alpine village in central Switzerland, it has meant a comeback as an international tourist destination.  The elderly Japanese couple seem lost. He keeps looking at the timetables posted for public transport. Train, bus or boat? She looks around, bewildered, as if seeking inspiration. With their boots and trekking poles the pair are equipped for Alpine hiking. But here in the little railway station of Brunnen in Canton Schwyz on the banks of Lake Lucerne, they seem completely disoriented.  I try to help them: "Stoos?". No reaction. "Railway?". Nothing. Then I stretch out my fingers and curve my hand, to indicate a steep incline: "World record?". "Yes, yes!", they chorus. Lack of any real common language ends further discussion. One thing is clear, however: the tourists want to try the steepest funicular railway in the world. Featured ...
Categories: News EN

World’s steepest funicular puts Stoos back on the tourist map

Swissinfo EN - Sun, 08/26/2018 - 11:00
Straight up to the top of the mountain: the Stoos funicular railway gives you the steepest ascent of its kind in the world. For the little Alpine village in central Switzerland, it has meant a comeback as an international tourist destination.  The elderly Japanese couple seem lost. He keeps looking at the timetables posted for public transport. Train, bus or boat? She looks around, bewildered, as if seeking inspiration. With their boots and trekking poles the pair are equipped for Alpine hiking. But here in the little railway station of Brunnen in Canton Schwyz on the banks of Lake Lucerne, they seem completely disoriented.  I try to help them: "Stoos?". No reaction. "Railway?". Nothing. Then I stretch out my fingers and curve my hand, to indicate a steep incline: "World record?". "Yes, yes!", they chorus. Lack of any real common language ends further discussion. One thing is clear, however: the tourists want to try the steepest funicular railway in the world. Featured ...
Categories: News EN

Bridge safety and banking success

Swissinfo EN - Sat, 08/25/2018 - 16:00
Almost every article published by swissinfo.ch contains a percentage, an age, an amount of money or some other figure. Here’s a round-up of the most interesting statistics to appear in the past week’s stories. Sunday 40 An estimated 1% of Switzerland's bridges - around 40 structures in total - are in a critical condition, the transport ministry says. But the state of the Swiss road network, including tunnels, is generally good. The transport ministry published the information in response to the collapse of a motorway bridge in neighbouring Italy.    Monday 38 A government advisory committee has called for the introduction of a 38-week parental leave. The proposal comes as parliament is about to tackle plans for paternity leave. Currently, only mothers benefit from 14-week statutory maternity leave. Tuesday 1,450 A famous restaurant perched under a cliff at 1,450 metres (4,800 feet) above sea level in the eastern Swiss Alps is looking for new managers. The couple running ...
Categories: News EN

Bridge safety and banking success

Swissinfo EN - Sat, 08/25/2018 - 16:00
Almost every article published by swissinfo.ch contains a percentage, an age, an amount of money or some other figure. Here’s a round-up of the most interesting statistics to appear in the past week’s stories. Sunday 40 An estimated 1% of Switzerland's bridges - around 40 structures in total - are in a critical condition, the transport ministry says. But the state of the Swiss road network, including tunnels, is generally good. The transport ministry published the information in response to the collapse of a motorway bridge in neighbouring Italy.    Monday 38 A government advisory committee has called for the introduction of a 38-week parental leave. The proposal comes as parliament is about to tackle plans for paternity leave. Currently, only mothers benefit from 14-week statutory maternity leave. Tuesday 1,450 A famous restaurant perched under a cliff at 1,450 metres (4,800 feet) above sea level in the eastern Swiss Alps is looking for new managers. The couple running ...
Categories: News EN

Last chance to see Szeemann's obsessions

Swissinfo EN - Sat, 08/25/2018 - 15:00
Harald Szeemann was kicked out of Bern in 1969 after his controversial final exhibition as director of the city's Kunsthalle. His groundbreaking work is once again being highlighted in Bern. Szeemann's (1933-2005) departure was a big artistic loss for the city. Bern would never manage to attract the European and international artistic avant-garde that flocked into town during Szeemann's time.  For the curator, though, it marked just the beginning of a prolific international career, becoming practically, "a synonymous with the advent of globalism in contemporary art", according to the leaflet accompanying the Harald Szeemann: Museum of Obsessions exhibition, currently on display in Szeemann's original 'laboratory', the Kunsthalle Bern.  After Bern, he would wreak artistic havoc in various cities, taking charge of some of the most important international art fixtures, such as the documenta in Kassel and the Venice Biennale.   His legacy cannot be overstated: as one of the most ...
Categories: News EN

Last chance to see Szeemann's obsessions

Swissinfo EN - Sat, 08/25/2018 - 15:00
Harald Szeemann was kicked out of Bern in 1969 after his controversial final exhibition as director of the city's Kunsthalle. His groundbreaking work is once again being highlighted in Bern. Szeemann's (1933-2005) departure was a big artistic loss for the city. Bern would never manage to attract the European and international artistic avant-garde that flocked into town during Szeemann's time.  For the curator, though, it marked just the beginning of a prolific international career, becoming practically, "a synonymous with the advent of globalism in contemporary art", according to the leaflet accompanying the Harald Szeemann: Museum of Obsessions exhibition, currently on display in Szeemann's original 'laboratory', the Kunsthalle Bern.  After Bern, he would wreak artistic havoc in various cities, taking charge of some of the most important international art fixtures, such as the documenta in Kassel and the Venice Biennale.   His legacy cannot be overstated: as one of the most ...
Categories: News EN

Setting sail in landlocked Switzerland

Swissinfo EN - Sat, 08/25/2018 - 11:00
In 1834 two entrepreneurs started to operate steam boats on Lake Zurich.  Little did they know that nearly two centuries later, passengers would still be queuing up to feel the wind in their hair as they jetted out onto the water aboard one of the lake’s boats. The boom years for lake transport came in the 1960s, as the Federal Institute of Technology Zurich’s archives show, with three new vessels being commissioned. The ‘Helvetia’, launched in 1964, was the flagship of Lake Zurich and 50 years on still retains its status. Its capacity was 1,500  — today, due to changes to the laws for safety, it has dropped to 1,000. In 1968, the Lake Zurich Navigation Company was operating a fleet of 15 motor vessels and two paddle steamers. People flocked to get on board to make short visits to neighbouring villages or spend an evening dancing on the decks in style. Growth and decline Although the capacity of the ships has declined, locals and tourists still enjoy taking boat trips on ...
Categories: News EN

Setting sail in landlocked Switzerland

Swissinfo EN - Sat, 08/25/2018 - 11:00
In 1834 two entrepreneurs started to operate steam boats on Lake Zurich.  Little did they know that nearly two centuries later, passengers would still be queuing up to feel the wind in their hair as they jetted out onto the water aboard one of the lake’s boats. The boom years for lake transport came in the 1960s, as the Federal Institute of Technology Zurich’s archives show, with three new vessels being commissioned. The ‘Helvetia’, launched in 1964, was the flagship of Lake Zurich and 50 years on still retains its status. Its capacity was 1,500  — today, due to changes to the laws for safety, it has dropped to 1,000. In 1968, the Lake Zurich Navigation Company was operating a fleet of 15 motor vessels and two paddle steamers. People flocked to get on board to make short visits to neighbouring villages or spend an evening dancing on the decks in style. Growth and decline Although the capacity of the ships has declined, locals and tourists still enjoy taking boat trips on ...
Categories: News EN

Advanced MicroAnalytical Testing Laboratory Offers Comparative Analysis to Help Support Modern Manufacturing

News Machinery - Fri, 08/24/2018 - 20:46

Advanced MicroAnalytical provides manufacturing support to help ensure that the new products made by companies will function according to its specifications through comparative analysis. Chemical composition, grade of alloy, as well as the workmanship used in the assembly or construction can have a significant impact on the final product. In certain critical applications, the combination of bulk properties and overall configuration of materials that are used in engineering or manufacturin...

Read the full story at https://www.webwire.com/ViewPressRel.asp?aId=227861

Categories: News EN

Switzerland’s love affair with multinationals

Swissinfo EN - Fri, 08/24/2018 - 17:00
Switzerland is home to some of the largest global companies. It has one of the highest concentrations of Fortune 500 companies in the world – nearly two for every million people. Low taxes, a skilled labour force, and economic stability have helped Switzerland attract and build some of the largest multinational companies. But, what is their economic value and what do they give back to society? Multinationals or MNCs are only 5% of all companies… The best available data indicates that there are roughly 25,500 foreign and Swiss multinationals in Switzerland, which is about 5% of the more than 580,000 registered companies (in French). Some 14,000 of these are Swiss-controlled companies with operations abroad according to estimates by the Swiss National Bank in cooperation with the Federal Office of Statistics. The remaining 11,500 are subsidiaries of foreign companies. The large majority of which are from Germany, the US, and France, and some 20% are administrative units or shell ...
Categories: News EN

Switzerland’s love affair with multinationals

Swissinfo EN - Fri, 08/24/2018 - 17:00
Switzerland is home to some of the largest global companies. It has one of the highest concentrations of Fortune 500 companies in the world – nearly two for every million people. Low taxes, a skilled labour force, and economic stability have helped Switzerland attract and build some of the largest multinational companies. But, what is their economic value and what do they give back to society? Multinationals or MNCs are only 5% of all companies… The best available data indicates that there are roughly 25,500 foreign and Swiss multinationals in Switzerland, which is about 5% of the more than 580,000 registered companies (in French). Some 14,000 of these are Swiss-controlled companies with operations abroad according to estimates by the Swiss National Bank in cooperation with the Federal Office of Statistics. The remaining 11,500 are subsidiaries of foreign companies. The large majority of which are from Germany, the US, and France, and some 20% are administrative units or shell ...
Categories: News EN

Floods: images of the past help prepare for the future

Swissinfo EN - Fri, 08/24/2018 - 11:45
With climate change, the risk of flooding is increasing in Switzerland. But the memory of these extreme events fades within a few years. A University of Bern project aims to reinforce collective memory by calling on citizens for their input. The deluge was as sudden as it was unexpected. On the night of June 11, a violent storm struck the Swiss city of Lausanne, flooding the streets as well as shops and underpasses. Within ten minutes, 41 litres (11 gallons) of water had fallen per square metre — the equivalent of two weeks' worth of 'normal' rainfall.  Those who experienced this exceptional event in person are not about to forget it. But in collective memory, it will probably disappear in a few years. Even if floods can cause enormous damage and have serious consequences for those affected, we forget about them quickly, wrote the Mobiliar Lab for Natural Risks at the University of Bern in a May press release (link in French and German). The lab researchers have therefore ...
Categories: News EN

Floods: images of the past help prepare for the future

Swissinfo EN - Fri, 08/24/2018 - 11:45
With climate change, the risk of flooding is increasing in Switzerland. But the memory of these extreme events fades within a few years. A University of Bern project aims to reinforce collective memory by calling on citizens for their input. The deluge was as sudden as it was unexpected. On the night of June 11, a violent storm struck the Swiss city of Lausanne, flooding the streets as well as shops and underpasses. Within ten minutes, 41 litres (11 gallons) of water had fallen per square metre — the equivalent of two weeks' worth of 'normal' rainfall.  Those who experienced this exceptional event in person are not about to forget it. But in collective memory, it will probably disappear in a few years. Even if floods can cause enormous damage and have serious consequences for those affected, we forget about them quickly, wrote the Mobiliar Lab for Natural Risks at the University of Bern in a May press release (link in French and German). The lab researchers have therefore ...
Categories: News EN

Studying democracy in an age of populism

Swissinfo EN - Fri, 08/24/2018 - 11:00
Democracy is under pressure all around the world with the emergence of authoritarian populists. A Swiss research institute is looking at how populists treat citizens’ rights.  The Centre for Democracy Studies Aarau (ZDA) is located in a grand old villa above the town of Aarau, 38 km (24 miles) west of Zurich. Scientists from various disciplines carry out fundamental research focusing on hot issues affecting Switzerland, Europe and other parts of the world.  The ZDA looks at issues – such as e-voting or populism – that are controversial among the public and not exactly plain sailing among scientists.  “As lawyers, it’s not at all easy to come up with a substantive definition of populism,” explains Andreas Glaser, a professor of law who heads the research institute together with a political scientist and an educational expert.  According to sound and widely discussed analyses – such as those of Freedom House or the Economist Intelligence Unit – the powerful, worldwide trend for ...
Categories: News EN